Questions? Call us today!
0333 773 7700

Offer IPv6 for broadband connections

Matt shared this idea 3 years ago
Planned

Support for IPv4 and IPv6 in the network for broadband and other connectivity services.

Best Answer
photo

It is very easy to get IPv6 using "6to4" (IPv6 packets encapsulated in IPv4 packets) as long as there is a low-latency 6to4 gateway available; such gateways always have conventional address of 192.88.99.1.

I have written a bit about it:


http://www.sabi.co.uk/blog/13-two.html#130712

http://www.sabi.co.uk/blog/12-fou.html#121029

http://www.sabi.co.uk/blog/12-two.html#120210

http://www.sabi.co.uk/blog/12-two.html#120130


The only requirement on the ADSL router is that it must allow IP packets with a protocol type of "41".


The limitation is that with NAT only a single host can be on 6to4; but then every 6to4 address defines a /48 IPv6 address space so that host can be a an IPv6 gateway.


It so happens that there is a relatively low latency 192.88.99.1 gateway a couple of hops outside the UNO network, it would be pretty easy for UNO to define their own 192.88.99.1 gateway(s) as apparently they already have IPv6 internally.

Comments (20)

photo
1

This is planned for the future and internal testing is ongoing.

photo
1

Any update on this ?

photo
1

As soon as there is any further update, we'll change the status from planned.

photo
1

Is there any way to see which wholesale provider we are each using or any details to the providers planned rollout? I know BT are planning for end of year, Sky by this summer and TalkTalk don't seem to have anything planned (I can't see much for the other providers who may provide wholesale). Would it be something we could pay the difference to receive sooner? i.e. Switching to a different wholesaler in the background who does have ipv6 in the area but staying with Uno this side?

photo
1

The underlying supplier makes no actual technical difference here as we don't offer their own direct service.


It is a work in progress for us and as soon as we are ready to release, this will be for all customers at the exact same time regardless of the underlying wholesale network used for that service.

photo
1

OK. If there are any pre-release trials I would be willing to trial, as would I'm guessing the other subscribers to this thread. Thanks

photo
1

We do already have a number of users we're working with, probably in the long term now but if that was the change, we would contact all users to look for further testers.


I can't say if and when that will happen though at this time.

photo
1

OK. Thank you.

photo
1

Any news on ipv6 for fiber customers?

maybe a hint of a possible availability


Thanks

photo
1

I'm afraid not.


We will update this post to live when it is.

photo
3

It is very easy to get IPv6 using "6to4" (IPv6 packets encapsulated in IPv4 packets) as long as there is a low-latency 6to4 gateway available; such gateways always have conventional address of 192.88.99.1.

I have written a bit about it:


http://www.sabi.co.uk/blog/13-two.html#130712

http://www.sabi.co.uk/blog/12-fou.html#121029

http://www.sabi.co.uk/blog/12-two.html#120210

http://www.sabi.co.uk/blog/12-two.html#120130


The only requirement on the ADSL router is that it must allow IP packets with a protocol type of "41".


The limitation is that with NAT only a single host can be on 6to4; but then every 6to4 address defines a /48 IPv6 address space so that host can be a an IPv6 gateway.


It so happens that there is a relatively low latency 192.88.99.1 gateway a couple of hops outside the UNO network, it would be pretty easy for UNO to define their own 192.88.99.1 gateway(s) as apparently they already have IPv6 internally.

photo
1

I have described in detail with boilerplate examples the necessary configuration for 6to4 under NAT on a typical ADSL line with a GNU/Linux system in a new post here:


http://www.sabi.co.uk/blog/16-two.html#161103

photo
1

A 6in4 tunnel is a good solution in the interim, however it's far from perfect. Netflix in particular are very diligent at blocking tunnel endpoints, meaning one has to implement DNS hacks to hide IPv6 from their website and apps.


The encapsulation also reduces the effective MTU by 20 bytes, lowering further the MSS available to services which are already suffering from PPPoE overhead. Your stats are interesting; a 10-15% penalty roughly translates to losing 1.5Mb/s on my ADSL connection, which is not insignificant. I'm very much looking forward to native IPv6!

photo
2

Hi


Is there any update on getting native ipv6? Or anything holding this rollout back no matter how technical the issue just so we have some vague guestimation of time scales?


Thanks

photo
1

Nothing further at this time but we will change the status on this and post an update once we can confirm more.

photo
1

When an IPv6 address becomes available, does the router automatically pick this up? I'm using a Billion 8800AXL (1st gen).


Thanks,


Steve

photo
2

It should do but each router may act differently.


We will not assign these by default initially but instead, offer them "on request" for existing customers. Over time once we can see how smooth that has been we may then apply by default to the remaining lines.

photo
1

IPv6 please.

photo
1

Still no progress ? 2 years since it was marked as "in internal testing"

photo
4

There is progress internally but as a smaller provider, we have to prioritise our build tasks. Whilst IPv6 is important, unfortunately, some other things can take priority.


Once we are happy with all our systems and the process of that, we will invite customers to enable their service for v6 and then apply it to the remainder automatically over time.

Comments have been locked on this page!